Squaw Valley Has Issued An Official Statement On The Quality Of Its Water

Squaw Valley Ski Resort has issued a statement on the water quality in Upper Mountain. The extended statement was drafted in response to the news made earlier this week concerning the quality of water in the region. According to the new reports, E. coli and coliform bacteria had been detected in the drinking water at the resort’s upper mountain.
 
The first concern about water quality in the area was reported on November 8. The information was reported to the Place County Department of Environmental health. Analysis of the water confirmed the potential health issue.
 
This confirmation prompted Squaw Valley to sprint into action. Experts were invited to treat the water. Later, the water started showing signs of improving. According to the most recent data, the levels of E. coli in three out of the four wells serving the upper mountain are showing low levels of coliform. E. Coli bacteria present in the wells have been destroyed. The director of Placer County Environmental Health, Wesley Nicks, confirmed this information. He acknowledged the same while speaking to the Sierra Sun on Tuesday.
 
Due to the water quality problems, restaurants at Upper Mountain were closed. The hotels will remain closed until the water sources have been declared free of any potential health hazard. Despite the closure of restaurants, skiers have been allowed to continue enjoying the resources provided by the Olympic Valley. However, these skiers are not allowed to drink water from the area until the problem is solved. Currently, no health issues have been reported in the area, and resort owners hope that it will remain that way.
 
The statement issued by Squaw Valley, one of the largest ski resorts in the region, pointed out the causes of the problem as well as how the authorities were going to handle it. The statement was issued on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 at 8 pm.
 
According to the statement, in October, Placer County experienced heavy rainstorms, which caused the problem. The heavy rains resulted in an unusual amount of surface runoff water in the region. Several water systems were flooded. This flooding resulted in the contamination of the water sources with E. coli and coliform bacteria. At Squaw Valley, the affected water systems were at High Camp and Gold Coast. The resort confirmed that at no point did the public have access to the water contained in the affected wells.
 
Since Squaw Valley routinely conducts tests on its water sources, especially after heavy rains, it was easy to detect the potential health issues. The resort began immediate consultation with experts on the way forward. From the advice of these experts, the resort has been able to follow the right steps to clean its water. Although the levels of bacteria have reduced, the business is continuing with the treatment. Squaw Valley has assured its customers that it will not be using water from the affected wells until the health officials and other experts have certified the water to be fit for human consumption. The company values the safety of its customers. This way, it is taking this issue seriously.
 
 
This information was originally mentioned on Sierra sun as outlined in this link http://www.sierrasun.com/news/environment/squaw-valley-issues-statement-on-upper-mountain-water-quality/